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Rico Gatson | The Palm Beach Post

Rico Gatson | The Palm Beach Post

Review by By Tony Doris

20 January 2019

Mural brings civil rights inspiration to CityPlace’s social setting

"WEST PALM BEACH — Artist Rico Gatson is bringing the legacy of civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. to downtown West Palm Beach’s CityPlace, with a series of multi-colored triangles in progress called Mountain Top, on the center’s Gardenia Garage, harkening to the assassinated reverend’s final speech."

 

Wolf Kahn | The New Criterion's Critic's Notebook

Wolf Kahn | The New Criterion's Critic's Notebook

18 December 2017

“Wolf Kahn” at Ameringer McEnery Yohe (through December 23): This week is the last chance to catch “Wolf Kahn,” an exhibition of paintings that push the limits of an abstract language that the American artist has been developing for over seventy years. The exhibition, at Chelsea’s Ameringer McEnery Yohe, comprises fifty-six oil landscapes that were all made within the past two years—a considerable testament to the vitality of Kahn’s vision and practice. These new paintings exude Kahn’s trademark high-pitched color, employed within fields of flittering, calligraphic textures that that seem to remove the pictures, more so than ever before in his mature work, from the natural world. This comprehensive survey of Kahn’s most recent direction, which closes on Saturday, is not to be missed.

Abstract Room | Interview with Markus Linnenbrink

Abstract Room | Interview with Markus Linnenbrink

Interview by Frédéric Caillard

18 December 2017

Can you tell us about the cuts, those thick layered paintings into which you literarily dig trenches?

Yes, the cuts make up the latest body of work that I introduced in the last two years. They are similar to my drill pieces; it is the same procedure, the same process. The resin gets layered on a wooden support, and when the piece seems to be thick enough to do something with it, I think about the last color which is going to be the top layer. The layering gets built up to a thickness of about 3 cm, so a painting can become quite heavy, it gets almost sculptural.

John Sonsini acquired by the Autry Museum of the American West

John Sonsini acquired by the Autry Museum of the American West

12 December 2017

John Sonsini's painting Christian & Francisco is now on view at the Autry Museum of the American West in Los Angeles, CA. 

ARTnews, A Milton Avery Feast Awaits at Miami Basel

ARTnews, A Milton Avery Feast Awaits at Miami Basel

by Andrew Russeth

7 December 2017

Call your Milton Avery–loving friends and grab a plane, train, or automobile to Miami. (If you don’t have any, just grab some friends and do the same: it’s time to make converts.) The late, great painter and once-in-a-generation colorist, who died in 1965 at the age of 79, is one of the stars of this year’s edition of Art Basel Miami Beach. No fewer than five galleries are presenting his works at the fair, where at least 10 works by the severely underrated American painter are hanging at the moment.

Ameringer | McEnery | Yohe at Art Basel Miami Beach

Ameringer | McEnery | Yohe at Art Basel Miami Beach

Artsy, The 15 Best Booths at Art Basel in Miami Beach

6 December 2017

Galleries, Booth G5

With works by Milton Avery, Helen Frankenthaler, Hans Hofmann, Alex Katz, Robert Motherwell, Willem de Kooning

Brian Alfred in August Journal

Brian Alfred in August Journal

Brian Alfred in August Journal Issue 02

29 November 2017

Issue 02 of AUGUST Journal, the New York issue. Featuring stories on Massimo and Lella Vignelli's apartment, Alanna Heiss's loft, Joe Baum's restaurants; with texts, photographs, and artworks by Pilar Viladas, Wendy Goodman, Matt Tyrnauer, Alix Browne, Ricky Clifton, Jason Schmidt, François Dischinger, Ngoc Minh Ngo, Martyn Thompson, Andrew Zuckerman, Matthew Johnston, Marc Yankus, Jean-Philippe Delhomme, Mel Odom, and many other grand New York legends.

John Sonsini at National Portrait Gallery, Washington D.C.

John Sonsini at National Portrait Gallery, Washington D.C.

The Sweat of Their Face: Portraying American Workers

3 November 2017 - 3 September 2018

The Sweat of Their Face” combines art and social history with representations of American laborers across genres and centuries of art. Artists such as Winslow Homer, Dorothea Lange, Elizabeth Catlett and Lewis Hine depict laborers throughout the changing landscape of America; from child and slave laborers to miners, railway and steel workers, to the modern gradual disappearance of the worker. Approximately 75 objects in all media (including video) highlight a point of connection between the artists and their predominately anonymous subjects.

Markus Linnenbrink at Maurizio Caldirola, Manza, Italy

Markus Linnenbrink at Maurizio Caldirola, Manza, Italy

THEREAINTNOEASYWAYOUT

16 November 2017 - 9 February 2018

La galleria Maurizio Caldirola arte contemporanea è lieta di presentare la prima mostra personale italiana di Markus Linnenbrink, artista tedesco residente a Brooklyn, New York.

Il lavoro di Markus si contraddistingue per la sperimentazione di un nuovo processoo creativo legato all’astrazione. Astrazione derivata da un paziente processo sico, metodico, legato alla strati cazione di particolari colori resinosi. Nella serie “Drip” l’artista è costretto ad una paziente attesa che consente al colore, libero, di de uire verso il basso tramite preziosi telai lignei e il risultato che ne deriva è una sottile campitura e strati cazione di tante linee culminanti, al termine, in gocce (drip).

Emily Mason at Mitchell • Giddings Fine Arts, Brattleboro, VT

Emily Mason at Mitchell • Giddings Fine Arts, Brattleboro, VT

Explorations

11 November 2017 - 7 January 2018

For the past thirty-two years Emily Mason has collaborated with five master printers to create works of a singular chromatic intensity, distinguishing and defining her prints as unique. Each printer offers individual direction which Mason modifies or personalizes to further stretch the boundaries of her gestures and color vocabulary. The exhibit represents several different printmaking techniques. What is common to all is that they start with one image on the first plate and end with a cohesive intense exchange between what we see and what lies beneath. Color, shape, and improvisational gesture are printed upon one another until the image is resolved in its final pass through the press. She embraces unique states, giving each work its own space. Imperfections are welcomed. If a tinge of red-orange reveals itself in the registration we read it not as a flaw, but as a brightly colored wink from Mason herself.

Mitchell•Giddings Fine Arts is pleased to offer a survey of Emily Mason’s prints from 1985 – 2016. This gallery-wide exhibit explores Mason’s adventurous approach to contemporary printmaking. Her monoprints, monotypes and solarplate prints epitomize her spontaneous and daring use of color and form. 

Tomory Dodge at Cherry and Martin, Los Angeles, CA

Tomory Dodge at Cherry and Martin, Los Angeles, CA

11 November 2017 - 27 January 2018

Over the course of his career, Tomory Dodge has become known for dynamic paintings that explore the representation and mechanics of picture-making. Thanks to mass media and modern technology, images today are on every conceivable surface and confront us at every moment. Painting, one of the oldest means of expression, remains a vital key to understanding the nature of images in modern life, whether they are experienced in the physical world, on our devices, or on-line.

Emily Mason: A Painting Experience

Emily Mason: A Painting Experience

November 2017

Emily Mason: A Painting Experience is a short documentary portrait about the prolific visual artist Emily Mason. With a career spanning over six decades, this film presents Mason as a shy yet innovative figure in American art, a pioneer in the field of lyrical abstraction, and a master of the so-called "poetry of color".

Amy Bennett at Wilding Cran Gallery, Los Angeles, CA

Amy Bennett at Wilding Cran Gallery, Los Angeles, CA

Really? - Curated by Beth Rudin DeWoody

8 November - 23 December 2017

Wilding Cran Gallery is pleased to present Really?, a group exhibition curated by Beth Rudin DeWoody featuring works in various media by both well-known and emerging artists who work in the field of contemporary realism to visually or conceptually challenge the viewer.

I have always been fascinated with photo-realistic drawings and paintings, and trompe l'oeil sculptures—from artists such as Bronzino and Jean-Étienne Liotard, to the Flemish painters and today's contemporary artists. The ability to create art that reflects reality in this way is a skill I admire so much, especially when the artist goes beyond the merely technical to incorporate more conceptual themes and their unique style of art-making. -Beth Rudin DeWoody

Guy Yanai at Praz-Delavallade, Los Angeles, CA

Guy Yanai at Praz-Delavallade, Los Angeles, CA

Barbarian in the Garden

11 November - 22 December 2017

Praz-Delavallade Los Angeles is pleased to present its first solo exhibition by Guy Yanai, opening on November 4 and on view through December 22, 2017. Yanai’s practice is fueled by fables, stories and hymns—each painting a reflection of the pragmatic side of our life. In his isolated moments one may find a smiling child, a big splash, lonely banana, bristling cactus, modernist lamp, a singing bird or a tiny boat gliding on placid waters below a clear sky. These individual vignettes bleed into one another and could continue forever, suspended in time. Many of Yanai’s subjects are intentionally recognizable and commonplace, rendered into a pixelated appearance.

Franklin Evans at Olin Gallery, Roanoke College, Salem, VA

Franklin Evans at Olin Gallery, Roanoke College, Salem, VA

Legacy: Highlights from the Roanoke College Permanent Collection

27 October - 3 December 2017

In celebration of Roanoke College's 175th anniversary this exhibition will showcase artists from the Roanoke College's Permanent Collection which will include Cory Archangel, Dennis Ashbaugh, Alice Aycock, Walter Biggs, William Binnie, Edward Marshall Boehm, Alice Ray Cathrall, Paul Chan, William Merrit Chase, Salvador Dali, N. Dash, E.V. Day, Betty Dixon, Michele Oka Doner, Bradford Ellis, Elliot Erwitt, Margaret Evangeline, Franklin Evans, Mark Fox, Clare Grill, Dorothy Gillespie, Debbie Grossman Jane Hammond, Pablo Helguera, Ryan Humphrey, Guillermo Kuitca, Diego Lasansky, Liz Magic Lazer, Shane McAdams, Yassi Mazandi, Tom Otterness, Alexandra Penney, Nathaniel Mary Quinn, Alan Reid Duke Riley, Rachel Rose, Kay Rosen, Emily Roysdon, Hunt Slonem, George Solonevich, Keith Sonnier Fred Tomaselli, Kerry Tribe, Robert Vickery, Andy Warhol, Rob Wynne, Firooz Zahedi and Andrew Zuckerman.   

Brian Alfred at the IFPDA Print Fair

Brian Alfred at the IFPDA Print Fair

The ARTpin Project - World House Editions

27 October 2017

Donald Taglialatella is pleased to announce that on Friday, 27 October, from 1 to 3pm, he will host a happening at his World House Editions stand, #102, at the IFPDA Print Fair in New York City. Dubbed The ARTpin Project and curated by painter and video animation artist, Brian Alfred, artists EJ Hauser (American, b.1967), Nathan Carter (American, b.1970) and Brian Alfred (American, b.1974) have each offered artwork for two limited edition pins and will be on hand at the World House Editions stand to give away these pins created for The Print Fair.  This project is the first in a series of ARTpin projects that World House Editions will be collaborating on with artists.

Hans Hofmann at the Musée National d'Histoire d'Art - Luxembourg

Hans Hofmann at the Musée National d'Histoire d'Art - Luxembourg

Creation in Form and Color: Hans Hofmann

6 October 2017 - 14 January 2018

The National Museum of History and Art dedicates for the first time in Luxembourg an exhibition to one of the main representatives of American Abstract Expressionism.

Hans Hofmann is one of the most important 20th century American modernist artists and art teachers. Born in 1880 in Weißenburg, Bavaria, Hofmann died in the United States in 1966. In his oeuvre, he combines the traditions of European modernist painting with influences from American postwar art.

Creation in Form and Color: Hans Hofmann is organized by University of California, Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive, in collaboration with the Kunsthalle Bielefeld and the National Museum for History and Art Luxemburg.

Monique van Genderen at Susanne Vielmetter

Monique van Genderen at Susanne Vielmetter

LA Times, "Monique van Genderen at Susanne Vielmetter: Liquid energy, on a grand scale"

30 September 2017

by David Pagel

The size of Monique van Genderen’s paintings on linen and aluminum panel dwarf visitors to her exhibition at Susanne Vielmetter Los Angeles Projects in Culver City.

Four giant paintings run from one inch above the gallery floor to within one inch of the top of the 14-foot walls. Each of the untitled works is 6½ feet wide.

Ten paintings are hung side by side so that you can see the sweeping gestures van Genderen has made with rags, rollers and mops. The suite measures more than 40 feet long and 8 feet tall. A large part of a wall had to be removed so that this freight train of a painting could hang on a single wall. The jagged edges of the removed section attest to the power of this abstract landscape, whose 10 panels, lined up like boxcars, seem go on forever.

Esteban Vicente at Galeria Marc Domènech

Esteban Vicente at Galeria Marc Domènech

Esteban Vicente: Color and Form

28 September - 17 November 2017

Esteban Vicente. Color and Form is the most important exhibition of this artist ever organized in Catalonia. With almost 40 works, this exhibition proposes a complete view of the artist's aesthetic development, starting with his figurative works, when he exhibited in Barcelona in the early 30's, until his latest abstract paintings of the 90's after going through the abstract expressionist stage that became so relevant in the United States during the 40s and 50s. In fact, Esteban Vicente was the only Spanish artist that belonged to the first generation of the renowned New York School.

Robert Cottingham at the Parrish Art Museum

Robert Cottingham at the Parrish Art Museum

Hamptons Art Hub, "Art Review: The Mystery and Magic of Photorealism at Parrish Art Museum"

26 September 2017

by Charles A. Riley II

The dazzling, at times even overwhelming “From Lens to Eye to Hand: Photorealism 1969 to Today” exhibition currently on view at the Parrish Art Museum in Water Mill, NY has all the earmarks, for this reviewer, of a reality TV competition. To me, the cumulative effect of the huge, boisterous paintings in this exhibition is to suggest a fierce contest for the title of America’s Top Realist.

Patrick Wilson at Orange County Museum of Art, Newport Beach, CA

Patrick Wilson at Orange County Museum of Art, Newport Beach, CA

Pivotal: Highlights from the Collection

7 October - 31 December 2017

OCMA has always championed artistic experimentation and innovation through a commitment to showing and collecting the work of dynamic and groundbreaking emerging artists. This installation will reveal how impactful OCMA has been in supporting the careers of some of the most influential artists from this region, often at pivotal moments in their careers.

Franklin Evans and Robert Cottingham at Ameringer | McEnery | Yohe

Franklin Evans and Robert Cottingham at Ameringer | McEnery | Yohe

Artefuse, "Visual Stories: Franklin Evans and Robert Cottingham at Ameringer | McEnery | Yohe Gallery"

19 September 2017

Everyone enjoys a good story, and when you visit the Ameringer McEnery Yohe Gallery in Chelsea, you can enjoy a wealth of interesting stories in the work currently on display.  When I peeked in the window before entering, I knew I was in for a treat. The first thing I saw were these large canvasses filled with primary and neon colors arranged in interesting geometric shapes.  Once I entered, I knew immediately this wouldn’t be an exhibit I could simply breeze through and get a general sense of.  I spent as much time as possible with the paintings, practically eating up the rich story life in each.

Todd Hebert at Museum of Contemporary Art, London

Todd Hebert at Museum of Contemporary Art, London

Nature Morte: Contemporary Artists Reinvigorate the Still Life

September 2017 - April 2018

A touring exhibition curated by Michael Petry and Roberto Ekholm.

The exhibition is based on Michael Petry's book Nature Morte: Contemporary Artists Reinvigorate the Still Life published by Thames & Hudson.

Travelling artists: Peter Abrahams, Sue Arrowsmith, Annie Attridge, Aziz + Cucher, Conrad Bakker, Barnaby Barford, Berthold Bell, Per Christian Brown, Mat Collishaw, Marcus Cope, Michael Craig-Martin, John Dugdale, Roberto Ekholm, Saara Ekström, Nancy Fouts, Nick Fox, Anya Gallaccio, Ana Genovés, Ori Gersht, Rigoberto A. Gonzalez, Cynthia Greig, Martin Gustavsson, Jefferson Hayman, Paul Hazelton, Todd Hebert, Renata Hegyi, Bill Jacobson, Alexander James, Peter Jones, Edward Kay, Rob Kesseler, Alana Lake, Janne Malmros, Carol Marin-Pache,Livia Marin, Caroline McCarthy, Damien Meade, John Mitchell, Polly Morgan, Dermot O'Brien, Gabriel Orozco, Bruno Pacheco, Guillaume Paris, Michael Petry, Marc Quinn, Eric Rhein, Miho Sato, Rebecca Scott, Andro Semeiko, Jane Simpson, Jim Skull, Matt Smith, Rob Smith, Jennifer Steinkamp, Richard Stone, Yuken Teruya, Maciej Urbanek, Mathew Weir, James White, Kraig Wilson, Cindy Wright

Bo Bartlett receives Society 1858 Prize for Contemporary Southern Art

Bo Bartlett receives Society 1858 Prize for Contemporary Southern Art

Columbus Ledger-Enquirer, Bo Bartlett captures the Southern experience in award-winning paintings

26 August 2017

by Carrie Beth Wallace

Columbus artist Bo Bartlett recently won the 2017 Gibbes Society 1858 Southern Contemporary Art Prize. The prize was sought after by over 200 artists throughout the Southeast.

Bartlett is widely recognized for his realist paintings. Notable ongoing local contributions include his art initiative for the homeless called Home is Where the Art Is, and the Bo Bartlett Center at Columbus State University opening January 2018.

The artist recently corresponded with Sunday Arts reporter Carrie Beth Wallace to discuss his reaction to winning the award, his current projects, how he’s feeling about the impending Bartlett Center opening, and what he plans to do with the prize money in the future.

This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

Rod Penner at Flint Institute of Arts, Flint MI

Rod Penner at Flint Institute of Arts, Flint MI

Size Matters: Big and Small Works from the FIA Collection

16 September - 30 December 2017

Size Matters: Big and Small Works from the FIA Collection features objects of both gigantic and diminutive size. Throughout history, artists have often utilized the element of size (or scale) when determining the context of their work. The objects in this exhibition date from the late 18th century to the 21st century.

Guy Yanai at Ameringer | McEnery | Yohe

Guy Yanai at Ameringer | McEnery | Yohe

Galerie Magazine, The Bright and Bold Art of Guy Yanai

8 August 2017

by Catherine Hong

When Guy Yanai was 7 years old, he and his family moved from Haifa, Israel, to Framingham, Massachusetts, in the suburbs of Boston. The shock of dislocation he experienced is one he’s never forgotten, with the family’s split-level house at the center of his memories. But what did that house really look like? Thirty-three years later, the artist turned to Google Street View.

The painting Yanai produced, Fox Hill Road (2017), was a central image of his solo show at New York’s Ameringer | McEnery | Yohe gallery this past summer. Simultaneously melancholy, mundane, and joyful, it has the woozy, strangely flattened perspective familiar to anyone who’s shopped for real estate using Google technology. It also has the dreamlike quality that comes with the recollection of a long-distant childhood home.

Bo Bartlett receives Society 1858 Prize for Contemporary Southern Art

Bo Bartlett receives Society 1858 Prize for Contemporary Southern Art

2017 Winner

16 August 2017

Born in Columbus, Georgia, Bartlett is acclaimed for his large-scale paintings that explore American life and cultural heritage. His realist style has been honed through extensive training, including a degree from the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. Bartlett’s work is included in numerous public collections including the Denver Museum of Art, the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, and the Seattle Art Museum.

Guy Yanai at Ameringer | McEnery | Yohe

Guy Yanai at Ameringer | McEnery | Yohe

Studio International, Guy Yanai: ‘Every work that leaves my studio is part of an inexhaustible autobiography’

12 August 2017

by Cassie Davies

Guy Yanai’s solo exhibition at Ameringer McEnery Yohe in New York takes its title from an unwritten book by the Russian-born American novelist Vladimir Nabokov. When Nabokov moved to Europe in 1961, to live at the Montreux Palace hotel in Switzerland, he planned to write a sequel to his celebrated autobiography Speak, Memory. It was to be called Speak, America. The book, however, was never written, and Nabokov died in 1977 leaving behind the “shell” of an unwritten, autobiographical sequel.

Hans Hofmann at the New York Studio School

Hans Hofmann at the New York Studio School

2017 Alumni Association Exhibition - Special Exhibit of Founding Faculty / Key Influencers

24 July - 27 August 2017

Artists include: Nicolas Carone, Paul Georges, Philip Guston, Hans Hofmann, Mercedes Matter, George McNeil, Ruth Miller, Alice Neel, Chuck O'Connor, Philip Pearlstein, Vita Petersen, Milton Resnick

Inka Essenhigh at Shrine, New York, NY

Inka Essenhigh at Shrine, New York, NY

The New York Times, What to See in New York Art Galleries This Week

27 July 2017

by Will Heinrich

Another Place

Through 3 September

There’s a smoky texture of hypnagogic disorientation on Henry Street inside the artist-run space Shrine. Loose but elaborate figurative work by a dozen painters and sculptors, all of it small scale and much of it held together by a shared palette of purples and browns, makes for a desperately welcome getaway into the cool fertility of unworldly private fantasy.

In “Study for Monsters of Manhattan,” Inka Essenhigh paints three mysterious women with watery lines and finely observed anatomical details. Alice Mackler’s earthenware figure combines squeezes, pokes and thumbprints with a rooster-colored glaze, creating a startling mannequin of bright-eyed psychological defiance. Kevin McNamee-Tweed’s winning monoprints look like plates from a hobo history of civilization, and in Charlie Roberts’s trippy lavender acrylic of a charismatic dancing house plant, apparently rough edges belie a deeply satisfying sense of balance.

Tomory Dodge Heads to Ameringer | McEnery | Yohe

Tomory Dodge Heads to Ameringer | McEnery | Yohe

ARTnews

26 July 2017

by Andrew Russeth

It is the middle of the summer, but the gallery news does not stop!

Today Chelsea’s Ameringer | McEnery | Yohe announced that it will now represent painter Tomory Dodge, who previously showed in New York with CRG Gallery, which said in May that it would close after 25 years in business.

Dodge, who is based in Los Angeles, makes shimmering abstractions that are loosely interlocked and layered. They are playful, sometimes even effervescent, and can be vaguely spiritual. His paintings are in the collection of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Whitney Museum, and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, among quite a few others.

Franklin Evans at Nuovo Spazio di Casso, Casso, Italy

Franklin Evans at Nuovo Spazio di Casso, Casso, Italy

La lama di Procopio

5 August - 1 October 2017

A Dolomiti Contemporanee and AGI Verona Collection exhibit Curated by Gianluca D'Incà Levis and Giovanna Repetto

Opening Saturday, 5 August, 6 PM

Artists: Gundam Air, Franklin Evans, Stuart Arends, Cristian Chironi, Ode De Kort, Alexandre Singh, Etienne Chambaud, Gianni Caravaggio, Eugenia Vanni, Marcelline Delbecq, Corinna Gosmaro, Pratchaya Phintong, Renato Leotta, Marko Tadic, James Beckett, Jiri Kovanda, Davide Mancini Zanchi, Maria Laet, Ivan Moudov, Michail Sailstorfer/Heinert Jürgen, Christian Manuel Zanon.

La lama di Procopio is a collective contemporary art exhibit, realized thanks to the collaboration between Dolomiti Contemporanee and the AGI Verona Collection by Anna and Giorgio Fasol, and that hosts the works of twenty-two young international artists.

Markus Linnenbrink at New Art Projects, London

Markus Linnenbrink at New Art Projects, London

Abstract Remix

7 July - 26 August 2017

Featuring: Adrian Esparza, Joachim Grommek, Markus Linnenbrink, Jonathan Parsons, Jan van der Ploeg, Markus Weggenmann, Beat Zoderer

Thomas Taubert and Fred Mann are delighted to present a group show exploring the contemporary nature of abstraction. The two galleries have observed each other’s programs over the years and now seek to place works by their artists alongside each other.

The impetus for the exhibition is a comparison between two artists with a very different practice. Jonathan Parsons and Markus Linnenbrink. Parsons at his last show at New Art Projects explored color by expanding the palette of color theory and creating a series of works that questioned it. Linnenbrink often uses a photographic base to his works and then imposes color on top or creates a flawless surface, which he then drills into to reveal layers of contrasting color poured beneath.

Suzanne Caporael at The FLAG Art Foundation

Suzanne Caporael at The FLAG Art Foundation

The Times

1 June - 11 August 2017

The FLAG Art Foundation presents The Times from June 1 – August 11, 2017, on its 9th floor gallery. The exhibition uses The New York Times as its point of departure and features over 80 artists, artist duos, and collectives who use the “paper of record” to address and reframe issues that impact our everyday lives.

Reading The New York Times is embedded in many people’s daily routines. This chronicle of geopolitical and local issues, tragedies, human interest stories, and trends in culture, serves as both a source of inspiration and medium for artists to assert their perspectives on the state of the world. In the wake of the 2016 presidential election, where news media was deemed the “the enemy of the people,” and The New York Times directly attacked and labeled as “fake news,” FLAG began developing an exhibition examining how seminal artists, such as Robert Gober, Ellsworth Kelly, Lorraine O’Grady, Fred Tomaselli, and others, who have used and been inspired by this newspaper in their practice. To give voice to a larger community, FLAG put out an open call for artist submissions that received 400+ proposals from around the world, and accounts for over half of the artists featured in the exhibition.

Suzanne Caporael at Cross Contemporary Art

Suzanne Caporael at Cross Contemporary Art

SITE/SIGHT

26 July - 21 August 2017

Opening reception: Saturday 29 July, 5-8pm

The paintings in this exhibition, SITE/SIGHT, are rooted in direct observation and are influenced by each artist’s perceptual practice and long-cultivated process of close study. Falling along a continuum between abstraction and representation they evoke a strong sense of place in the everyday world. Although we may not recognize the specific motif inferred (landscape, night sky, city, etc.) the authority of perception is tangible.

Sites, subjects, and methods of observation are critical to each artist’s visual language: planted fields, elevations seen from an airplane window, gradations of color in a sky reflected on a watery plane, shapes glanced at through apertures between buildings, or the puzzle of shapes in a tapestry-like world are some of the inspirations for the paintings shown here. Often the focus is upon a fragment of a larger subject or on an aspect removed from its larger context, adding an interesting ambiguity to the work.

Suzanne Caporael, Martha Diamond, Sharon Horvath, Jacqueline Gourevitch, Ellen Kozak, and Joyce Robins are painters in whose work abstraction conveys the resonance of close observation and place.

Jason Middlebrook at Jeff Bailey Gallery, Hudson, NY

Jason Middlebrook at Jeff Bailey Gallery, Hudson, NY

12 August - 17 September 2017

Opening reception: Saturday 12 August, 6-8pm

http://www.baileygallery.com/exhibitions/upcoming

Rico Gatson | The Village Voice

Rico Gatson | The Village Voice

Review by Siddhartha Mitter

July 2017

Black Lives Shine in Rico Gatson’s New Show

"Rico Gatson’s studio, in Bushwick, is awash in color and geometry. Tall rectangular panels painted in intricate patterns lean against a wall like abstract totems. Other planks lie across tables, works in progress involving ovals and circles. Large paintings on the wall alternate geometric sections in red, black, orange, yellow, and green with others in black and white. Nearby, silhouettes taken from vintage images of Black Panthers and civil rights protesters stand beneath strong colored vertical stripes or radiating lines."

Bo Bartlett on Andrew Wyeth

Bo Bartlett on Andrew Wyeth

Hyperallergic, Remembering My Friend Andrew Wyeth on His 100th Birthday

12 July 2017

by Bo Bartlett

Today, Andrew Wyeth would’ve celebrated his 100th birthday.

In 1991, I was 35 years old and coming off of a successful show at PPOW Gallery when on the next to last day of the exhibition art critic Roberta Smith wrote a negative review of the work in The New York Times.

I had a strict rule of not reading any of my reviews good or bad. But Wendy from the gallery encouraged me to go out and buy the paper and read the review, because, she said, I would need to “be aware of what people would be saying about the work.” Reluctantly, I did as my gallerist instructed. Although it stung, I didn’t really care about the review at the time. But, the following months shed a different light on the negative ramifications of bad press. Several scheduled articles dried up. Sales slowed to a trickle. I found myself in need of appreciation and resources.

Guy Yanai at Ameringer | McEnery | Yohe

Guy Yanai at Ameringer | McEnery | Yohe

Sight Unseen, Haifa, Hockney, and the Aesthetic of Suburbia - Guy Yanai's New Paintings in NYC

10 July 2017

by Jill Singer

Much has been made of the fact that the young Israeli artist Guy Yanai uses painting — an ancient, laborious technique — as his medium, even as he embraces the digital and new media norms of today (even going so far as to reference pixelation in his technique, with short, deliberate bands of color). But I can’t imagine his work would be as indelible as it is in any other medium: It’s stuck with me since I first encountered it in 2014, and his style — which mixes the aesthetics of a transcontinental childhood spent in Haifa, Israel and suburban Boston, with a dash of Hockney — is instantly recognizable. A new exhibition of works on view at Ameringer McEnery Yohe in New York until August 18 deepens his body of work, meditating on experience, memory, and language in a series of 13 new paintings.

Guy Yanai: Interview

Guy Yanai: Interview

Hunted Projects

6 July 2017

Guy Yanai in dialogue with Steven Cox

Steven Cox: Can you tell me a little about yourself, your background, and how/when you first started working full-time as an artist?

Guy Yanai: I was born in Haifa. Then moved to the states in 1984, outside of Boston. I was always into art. It took many years before all I did was this.

SC: Can you tell me about your current studio and working routine? Do you have any morning rituals or habits that contribute towards a productive day within the studio?

GY: I moved to a ground floor studio about a year and a half ago. I fully redid the space, put in good lighting, a kitchen, strong AC units, everything I could. Before that I was in the same building but on the third floor with no elevator (big shipping traumas), no bathroom, no sink, and no kitchen, so it’s very nice to have the studio I have now. I walk to the studio, usually get coffee on the way, maybe granola. I make good coffee now in the studio as well.  The thing that really contributes to good productive days is just to really have a studio practice. The more I'm there the better every day gets.

Bo Bartlett works on feature-length film

Bo Bartlett works on feature-length film

Columbus Ledger-Enquirer, Columbus artist Bo Bartlett keeps it local for his first feature-length film

20 June 2017

by Chuck Williams

Columbus artist Bo Bartlett, known nationally for his realist works, is painting again.

But this time the canvas is different, even if the familiar backdrop of his hometown of Columbus is the same.

Bartlett, along with his wife and fellow artist Betsy Eby, is directing and producing a feature-length film — “Things that Don’t Stay Fixed.” It is being shot this month throughout Columbus.

It’s the biggest painting we have ever made,” Eby said.

The two are self-funding the ultra low-budget film that has paid lead actors and paid professional production crews.

Wolf Kahn at Brattleboro Museum & Art Center, Brattleboro, VT

Wolf Kahn at Brattleboro Museum & Art Center, Brattleboro, VT

VTDigger, Vermont artist Wolf Kahn shows his true colors

18 June 2017

by Kevin O'Connor

BRATTLEBORO — Artist Wolf Kahn recalls picking up this town’s newspaper 40 years ago to see himself introduced to Vermonters through a particularly top-dollar interview.

The first question was, ‘How many paintings do you do a year?’ I said maybe 100. The second was, ‘How much do you charge?’ I said a couple of hundred bucks. The next time I had to have my barn reshingled, all of a sudden the price went up.”

Kahn nevertheless thinks highly of his neighbors, be they the farmers who live next door or their cattle that graze his land.

I’ve gotten to feel like I’m no longer just a flatlander — I belong here.”

Locals say that’s an understatement.

Isca Greenfield-Sanders at Ameringer | McEnery | Yohe

Isca Greenfield-Sanders at Ameringer | McEnery | Yohe

Galerie Magazine, Isca Greenfield-Sanders Creates Dreamy, Vintage-Inspired Paintings

13 June 2017

This June, visitors to Ameringer | McEnery | Yohe gallery in Chelsea, Manhattan, are confronted with a sea of blues, both literal and figurative, and a strong sense of nostalgia for summers spent by the sea. “Keep Them Still” is an exhibition of striking new works by New York-based artist Isca Greenfield-Sanders, on display through July 1. A collection of watercolor-and-oil paintings depicting blurred, sun-dappled beach scenes and close-ups of abstracted rippled waves fill the rooms. In the first space, two wave paintings—one pink and one blue—hang opposite a pair of zoomed-out coastline paintings from which they were extracted and distilled.

Iva Gueorguieva: Studio Visit

Iva Gueorguieva: Studio Visit

Art and Cake, Studio Visit: Iva Gueorguieva, A Translator of the Senses...

14 June 2017

by Gary Brewer

Iva Gueorguieva tells stories, or better stories are told through her. Her ‘memory body’ filters the myriad narratives that she observes and that saturate her consciousness. Iva has an acute memory, collecting observations from the books she reads and the world at large; random bits of information, a persons face, their expression, their posture, the room in which she saw them, fragments of life’s living theater, collected like colorful pieces of fabric. Then in an improvisational approach she unfurls these memories and ideas onto her vast canvases weaving them together to inform the meta narratives which emerge in the spontaneous approach she takes in creating her large scale ‘abstractions’. “I do not paint images, the paintings are improvisational, I bring everything from my life experience and knowledge to the work. I set up limitations to create within, it is a way to frame the work, to guide it into an area of interest, a subject emerges within these constraints.”

Liat Yossifor at Torrance Art Museum, Torrance, CA

Liat Yossifor at Torrance Art Museum, Torrance, CA

Why Art Matters!

17 June - 12 August 2017

OPENING RECEPTION: SATURDAY, 17 JUNE, 6-9 PM

Why Art Matters! is Torrance Art Museum's response to the potential defunding of the National Endowment for the Arts. The Museum has invited leading curators from across Southern California to nominate artists that reflect upon the project.

Participating curators include: Dan Cameron, Emily Gonzalez-Jarrett, Kio Griffith, Nancy Meyer, Kristina Newhouse, Max Presneill, Paul Schimmel, Tyler Stallings, and Catherine Taft.

Artists include: Chaz Bojorquez, Beatriz Cortez & Rafa Esparza, Finishing School, Arshia Haq, Kenyatta A C Hinkle, Linda Pollack, Henry Taylor, Glen Wilson, and Liat Yossifor.

Rod Penner at the Parrish Art Museum, Water Mill, NY

Rod Penner at the Parrish Art Museum, Water Mill, NY

From Lens to Eye to Hand: Photorealism 1969 to Today

6 August 2017 - 21 January 2018

From Lens to Eye to Hand reexamines this important movement in contemporary art that found its roots in the late 1960s in California and New York and continues today. Photorealism reintroduced what many considered to be straightforward representation into an art world more attuned to the burgeoning conceptual framework of artistic practice coming out of Pop and into Minimalism, Land Art, and Performance Art. Often misunderstood and sometimes negatively criticized as being overtly tradition-al, these artists were, and are, trailblazers.

Isca Greenfield-Sanders at Ameringer | McEnery | Yohe

Isca Greenfield-Sanders at Ameringer | McEnery | Yohe

1 June 2017

Brian Alfred: Interview

Brian Alfred: Interview

Maake Magazine

May 2017

Questions by Emily Burns

Thanks so much for taking the time to chat about your work and recent projects. Congrats on the recent showing of your animation Chromacity at Art Basel in Miami. The projection was 7,000-square-feet on the exterior wall of the Frank Gehry-designed New World Center in Miami Beach, Florida. Is that the largest projection of your work at this point? What is it like to have your work in such a highly visible, publicized space, in such a big way?

Thanks. Yeah, I suppose that’s the biggest I have ever had my animations projected. I love having the work in public places. There’s such a different feel and reaction to it than in the gallery. I’m so happy when my work is able to reach beyond the gallery-goer and to the person on the street who may not be intending to see art during their day. I’ve been fortunate enough to show the animations in places like Times Square, Eventi Plaza, Sundance and even on buildings in Australia. To me, it’s very exciting for my work to be seen in such diverse places. 

Jason Middlebrook at Children's Museum of the Arts, New York, NY

Jason Middlebrook at Children's Museum of the Arts, New York, NY

Maker, Maker

8 June - 10 September 2017

Exhibiting Artists Derrick Adams, Sanford Biggers, Caroline Wells Chandler, Adam Frezza/Terri Chiao, Brad Kahlhamer, Jon Kessler, LoVid, Jason Middlebrook, Rebecca Morgan, Carlos Rolón/Dzine, and the CMA Permanent Collection

Children’s Museum of the Arts is pleased to announce Maker, Maker, a group exhibition curated by Paul Laster and Renée Riccardo that explores the recent explosion of D.I.Y. Maker culture and the expanding relationship between fine art and craft.

Rico Gatson | The Brooklyn Rail

Rico Gatson | The Brooklyn Rail

Review by William Corwin

May 2017

RICO GATSON: Icons 2007 - 2017

"When elevating a human subject to sainthood or, at least making them an object of veneration, an artist needs to consider practically how it is that light or beams of pure energy will emanate from their being. Rico Gatson’s exhibition Icons 2007–2017 is just such an exercise in catapulting the human into the supernatural realm. We are watching an artist doing what artists do best: rendering the unimaginable into the visual and the unspeakable into human terms."

Rico Gatson | The New Yorker

Rico Gatson | The New Yorker

Review by Vinson Cunningham

5 May 2017

How Radical Can A Portrait Be?

"Icons, a solo exhibition of recent works on paper by the artist Rico Gatson, curated by Hallie Ringle, takes this ecstasy in personhood and makes it as visible as people themselves. Gatson appropriates old photographic images of famous black Americans—Zora Neale Hurston, Gil Scott-Heron, Nina Simone, Marvin Gaye—and surrounds them with bright, colorful lines that shoot outward from the personages to the borders of the page."

Iva Gueorguieva at Sophia Contemporary Gallery, London, England

Iva Gueorguieva at Sophia Contemporary Gallery, London, England

Shifting Landscapes

28 April - 23 June 2017

Sophia Contemporary is proud to present Shifting Landscapes, a group show of contemporary American artists exploring abstraction through painting, photography and sculpture. Featuring six artists - Afruz Amighi, Iva Gueorguieva, Herman Mejia, Amir Nikravan, Holton Rower and Hannah Whitaker - the exhibition reflects on the evolving nature of American art. Casting a light on the diversity of contemporary approaches to abstraction, the works explore the artists’ impact on the landscape of art and American culture, across generations and disciplines.

Through a variety of points of view and artistic practices, Shifting Landscapes provides a window into contemporary abstraction in America today. Issues of contemporaneity, materiality and historic legacy in a post-modern world unite the artists exhibited despite their differing artistic strategies, points of references and media of predilection. On a broader cultural level, the exhibition examines the multicultural nature of America at a time of division and isolation within the country. Many of the artists in the show live and work in the US, but were born in other countries including Iran, Bulgaria and Venezuela. By reinterpreting American abstraction through the prism of their own varied cultural backgrounds and artistic heritage, the artists urgently reaffirm the diversity and openness in American culture, at a pivotal point in the nation’s history.

Hans Hofmann at MOCA Jacksonville, Jacksonville, FL

Hans Hofmann at MOCA Jacksonville, Jacksonville, FL

The Wall Street Journal, 'Hans Hofmann: Works on Paper' Review: Practicing What He Taught

19 April 2017

by Robert Hobbs

The most comprehensive retrospective exhibition of works on paper by the Abstract Expressionist Hans Hofmann is now on view at Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville, a cultural institute of the University of North Florida. Curated by Wall Street Journal contributor Karen Wilkin and Marcelle Polednik of the Milwaukee Art Museum, this survey of 80 multimedia works, spanning the half-century from about 1914 to 1965, is an entrancing celebration of the thoroughly energized, richly hued works.

German-born Hans Hofmann (1880-1966) was the first person to formulate a set of principles for understanding modern art, making him one of the century’s most important teachers. He based them on his intimate acquaintance with Fauvism, Cubism and its lyrical offshoot, Orphism, while in Paris from 1905 to 1913, and years later, while back in Germany, with Surrealism.

Markus Linnenbrink at SLS Brickell, Miami, FL

Markus Linnenbrink at SLS Brickell, Miami, FL

Interior Design, 10-Story Markus Linnenbrink Mural Adorns Miami's SLS Brickell

1 April 2017

by Annie Block

Not one, not two, but three. That’s the number of new buildings in downtown Miami by Arquitectonica International Corporation and the Related Group that also feature large-scale works by world-renowned artists.

SLS Lux, the latest evolution of the brand—and the most VIP—opens in the fall, with hotel rooms and residences by Yabu Pushelberg, an LED facade by Ana Martinez, and an exterior mural by Fabian Burgos. Burgos’s work appears again on Brickell Heights, a two-tower condominium bowing in May with interiors by Rockwell Group. The hotel rooms and residences in the last of the trio, SLS Brickell, are open for business. Philippe Starck handled the interiors, and Markus Linnenbrink was commissioned for the exterior, emblazoning 40,000 square feet of the concrete facade with his signature drip painting.

Suzanne Caporael at Ameringer | McEnery | Yohe

Suzanne Caporael at Ameringer | McEnery | Yohe

The New York Times, What to See in New York Art Galleries This Week

13 April 2017

by Will Heinrich

Suzanne Caporael’s latest paintings — she numbers them sequentially, with the current show’s being in the low 700s — are divided into flat, irregular blocks of deep color with slightly blurry edges. The blocks themselves might pass for recessive Rothkos, pulling in a viewer’s gaze instead of glowing out to meet it. But the compositions as a whole look more like rice paddies at night. They’re distinctly horizontal in effect despite hanging on the wall, and the narrow boundaries between colors have all the silent force of property lines.

Bo Bartlett at the Mennello Museum of American Art, Orlando, FL

Bo Bartlett at the Mennello Museum of American Art, Orlando, FL

ArtDaily, Large-scale oil paintings by Bo Bartlett on view at the Mennello Museum of American Art

10 April 2017

ORLANDO, FLA.- The Mennello Museum of American Art is presenting the solo exhibition Bo Bartlett: American Artist. The exhibition, which runs through May 7, presents large-scale oil paintings that are figurative, psychologically imbued, beautifully rendered, and wonderfully sublime by one of the most significant American Realist painters of his generation.

Bo Bartlett is widely renowned for his multi-layered complex image making rooted in narrative, story telling, art history, literature, poetry, and every day life. Bartlett works in a long-established tradition in American painting that stretches from Thomas Eakins and Winslow Homer to Edward Hopper and Andrew Wyeth. Like these artists, Bartlett looks at America's land and people to depict the beauty he finds in everyday life. His paintings celebrate the underlying epic nature of the commonplace and the personal significance of the extraordinary. Of Bartlett’s work, Andrew Wyeth wrote, “Bo Bartlett is very American. He is fresh, he’s gifted, and he’s what we need in this country. Bo is one of the very few I feel this strongly about.”

Jason Middlebrook at the Dallas Art Fair

Jason Middlebrook at the Dallas Art Fair

Whitehot magazine, Dallas Art Fair vs. SP-Arte: Texas Tackles Brazil

April 2017

by Paul Laster

With two major art fairs taking place at the same time (April 6–9) on two different continents what’s an art lover to do? You either rack up some more airline miles, cash in your frequent flyer award points or do what we like to do—view Whitehot’s curated selection from each of the fairs online and then imagine that you can take home whatever your heart—and eye—desires.

The Dallas Art Fair returns to the Fashion Industry Gallery for its ninth edition with a formidable list of exhibitors—including Gagosian Gallery, Simon Lee Gallery and Skarstedt Gallery, Shane Campbell Gallery, and Lehman Maupin, which are all new to the fair this year. With more than 90 galleries from 16 countries, this year’s show looks like it could be its best.

Amongst our favorite artworks being exhibited here are Marc Dennis’ realistic still-life painting of luscious flowers at Dallas’ Cris Worley Fine Arts, Francis Upritchard’s gesturing bronze figure at London‘s Kate MacGarry, Jason Middlebrook’s geometric abstraction on an elm plank at New York‘s Ameringer McEnery Yohe, Luis Gispert’s abstraction made by embedding gold chains in a field of black stones at Palma de Mallorca’s Lundgren Gallery, and Klara Kristalova’s ceramic sculpture of animals in a tub at Lehmann Maupin, with galleries in New York and Hong Kong.

Kevin Appel at Christopher Grimes Gallery, Santa Monica, CA

Kevin Appel at Christopher Grimes Gallery, Santa Monica, CA

slip collapse then and

18 March - 29 April 2017

Christopher Grimes Gallery is pleased to announce a solo exhibition of new works by Kevin Appel. Appel’s new series of paintings begin as primary arrangements: cut-out paper forms referencing the portholes of Jean Prouvé’s Maison Tropicale are combined with Appel’s own photographs of fragments of his previous works, landscapes, and images of Paolo Soleri’s Arcosanti. These forms are constructed into soft, sculptural collages on the studio wall that are photographed at close range and then printed onto canvas. Multiple layers of geometric and gestural marks are silkscreened and hand painted over these flattened images creating a rhythm within the painting while obfuscating the original subject matter. Appel’s paintings are prismatic collages, an investigation of new and old imagery engaged in a recursive conversation where images and forms are pulled from one canvas and used in another, their intersection hinting at a controlled collapse of utopian ideals.

Guy Yanai at Galerie Derouillon

Guy Yanai at Galerie Derouillon

M- Le Monde Magazine, Plein les yeux: La France vue d'Israël

11 March 2017

Par Lisa Vignoli

LES BON TITRES ONT PLUSIEURS VIES. L'amour des commencements, texte du psychanalyste français Jean-Bertrand Pontalis (1924-2013) datant de 1986, par exemple, renaît ces jours-ci—en anglais—dans une galerie parisienne avec l'exposition « Love of beginnings ». L'artiste israélien Guy Yanai a découvert cet ouvrage il y a une dizaine d'années. Depuuis, il a lu tout Pontalis, ou presque. Le plasticien affiche d'ailleurs, au fil de ses œuvres, une passion française, qui transparaît dans l'exposition. « Ça flirte avec l'obsession, sourit-il, mais pas seulement. Il y a sans doute quleuqe chose de l'ordre de la frustration, de la jalousie. Je ne serai jamais un Européen. Pourtant, tout ce qui m'intéresse du point de vue esthétique, intellectuel ou artistique vient de là. »

David Allan Peters at Royale Projects, Los Angeles, CA

David Allan Peters at Royale Projects, Los Angeles, CA

3 March 2017

David Allan Peters : Sheathes

Film by Eric Minh Swenson

Guy Yanai at Galerie Derouillon

Guy Yanai at Galerie Derouillon

Freunde von Freunden, Israeli Artist Guy Yanai creates pixelated paintings that reference the past, not the future

27 February 2017

by Andie Cusick

The Love of Beginnings book was actually given to me by a shrink that I was talking to years ago, like maybe over ten years ago,” says Israeli artist Guy Yanai, whose latest exhibition of the same title was influenced by JB Pontalis’ autobiography.

It was strange to get a book from her, and even stranger that the book had tons of highlights and notes all around it. As if I could see and hear her reading it. I remember reading it so slowly,” he adds. “What struck me the most (and resonated) was the non-linear fashion of the autobiography—these sort of black holes that appeared between periods of his life. I think that there a few of these black holes between the three paintings of this show. Maybe this show is the beginnings that remain between each of the works, maybe not.”

Bo Bartlett at the Mennello Museum of American Art, Orlando, FL

Bo Bartlett at the Mennello Museum of American Art, Orlando, FL

Artborne Magazine, The American Life of Bo Bartlett

2 March 2017

by Hind Berji

At first glance, Bo Bartlett‘s work doesn’t look like anything new. His large canvases are filled with the crisp realism of Edward Hopper, the small-town iconography of Norman Rockwell, and the vibrancy and luminism of George Caleb Bingham. Yet, Bartlett brings it all together to portray a fresh and complicated take on American life as he knows it. Organized by the Mennello Museum of American Art with an extension of four paintings at The Orlando Museum of Art, Bo Bartlett: American Artist features the seductive quality of oil paintings, which stems partly from his large canvases and polished aesthetic. His paintings are subdued with a warm light that looks like the most natural thing in the world—a fleeting, bittersweet, transitional light that falls on his characters. 

Rod Penner at Kunsthal Rotterdam

Rod Penner at Kunsthal Rotterdam

Hyperrealism - 50 Years of Painting

25 February - 4 June 2017

On Saturday 25 February, the Kunsthal Rotterdam is opening the exhibition ‘Hyperrealism - 50 Years of Painting’, a unique overview of photorealistic painting. Three generations of American and European artists illustrate the history of this fascinating, figurative art movement. With this retrospective, which includes 70 works by more than 30 artists, the Kunsthal is bringing an unparalleled collection of hyperrealistic masterpieces to the Netherlands.

Franklin Evans at New York Studio School

Franklin Evans at New York Studio School

Jennifer Samet in Conversation with Jackie Gendel and Franklin Evans

1 March 2017

Jackie Gendel (b. 1973, Houston, TX) received her BFA from Washington University, St. Louis, in 1996 and her MFA from Yale University in 1998. Recent exhibitions include Thomas Erben, New York; Jeff Bailey, Hudson; and Loyal Gallery, Malmö. Reviews of her work have appeared in Modern Painters, Artforum, Art in America, New Yorker, and Hyperallergic, to name a few. Gendel lives and works in Brooklyn, New York.

Franklin Evans creates painting installations with the artist’s studio as subject. He lives in New York. He has exhibited institutionally at MoMA PS1, The Drawing Center, El Museo del Barrio, deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum, RISD Museum. Awards include MacDowell Fellow; Yaddo Fellow; The Marie Walsh Sharpe Space Program; LMCC Workspace; NYFA Fellow Painting; Pollock- Krasner Foundation. He is represented by Ameringer McEnery Yohe in Chelsea. Jennifer Samet is a New York City-based curator and writer.  She teaches art history at The New York Studio School and The New School, and is the author of the popular column "Beer with a Painter," in Hyperallergic.  She is also the co-director of Steven Harvey Fine Art Projects, in the Lower East Side. WEDNESDAY, MARCH 1, 2017

New York Studio School of Drawing, Painting & Sculpture

8 West 8th Street, New York, NY 10011

Lectures begin at 6:30 pm. Lectures are free and open to the public. Seating may be limited.

Iva Gueorguieva in Galveston Artist Residency exhibition, Galveston, TX

Iva Gueorguieva in Galveston Artist Residency exhibition, Galveston, TX

The Reflection in the Sword of Holofernes

4 March - 13 May 2017

On view in the GAR Gallery

Opening Reception: Saturday 4 March, 6 to 9pm

Featured artists: Mequitta Ahuja, Angela Dufresne, Hannah Rose Dumes, Dana Frankfort, Iva Gueorguieva, Kelly Klaasmeyer, Melinda Laszczynski, Tiffany Livingston, Dona Nelson, Gael Stack, Kelli Vance, Hilary Wilder

Guy Yanai at Galerie Derouillon, Paris, France

Guy Yanai at Galerie Derouillon, Paris, France

Love of Beginnings

16 March - 29 April 2017

Galerie Derouillon is pleased to present the second solo exhibition of the painter Guy Yanai in Paris.

Opening reception: Thursday 16 March, from 6 to 9pm.

Beginnings have a personal resonance for Yanai. He has spent his life starting over, moving between continents and across countries--new friends, new home--finally coming full circle and settling where his journey first began, in Israel, the land of the displaced. But even there he remains a foreigner, ensconced in his studio on a shady street in south Tel Aviv, rootless and moveable as the potted plants he often likes to paint. Far from disorienting, this outsider’s gaze is the perfect position for a painter who loves to look.

Love of Beginnings is Yanai’s second solo exhibition at Galerie Derouillon. At the centre of the show are three oil paintings, arranged in no particular order or sequence. Club Med Serre Chevalier (2017) depicts a resort in France, based on photographs taken by tourists and posted to Tripadvisor. Kitchen (2016/17) is a view of the artist’s apartment in Tel Aviv. The Piano Lesson (2017) is Yanai’s transcription of Matisse’s painting of the same title from exactly 100 years ago.

The Drug of Abstraction: An Interview with Beverly Fishman | Art in America

The Drug of Abstraction: An Interview with Beverly Fishman | Art in America

by Jason Stopa

17 February 2017

Beverly Fishman creates powerful abstract paintings that address technology and the pharmaceutical industry. Fishman lives and works in Detroit, where she teaches painting at the Cranbrook Academy of Art. She spent a sabbatical in New York last year, and late in the summer I had the opportunity to visit her in her studio. Fishman spoke at length about drugs, systems of dependency, and the insidious nature of healthcare in America. While I had prepared to discuss her geometric abstractions, her candor came as a surprise. The country’s current discourse on healthcare give her paintings particular significance. We remain one of the few industrialized nations without universal healthcare. With the election of Donald Trump, Republicans stand poised to repeal the Affordable Care Act. Furthermore, many American citizens take a cocktail of prescription and illicit drugs to simply feel normal.

Fishman is a painter with the concerns of a sculptor, making paintings that require high levels of production. Her studio practice includes manufacturing uniquely shaped supports and consulting with automotive paint specialists to get the background she needs to achieve industrial finishes.  Fishman’s solo exhibition “DOSE,” curated by Nick Cave, opens Thursday at the CUE Art Foundation in New York, where it is on view through April 5.

Franklin Evans at Abrons Art Center

Franklin Evans at Abrons Art Center

Art in America, Sass and Sensibility: The Eighth American Realness Festival

23 January 2017

by Eric Sutphin

As I waited in the lobby of the Experimental Theater to see Juliana May's Adult Documentary (2016), amid a scrappy installation by Franklin Evans composed of paper detritus and neon tape, I felt unmoored, uninitiated. Had I not read enough Butler or Sedgwick or Baldwin to fully understanding the goings-on? Has realness become institutionalized as yet another countercultural phenomenon that has been converted into an academicized aesthetic proposition? Sound bites from the crowd began to tell me a thing or two. A young woman behind me said to a well-known choreographer: "I just wrote about you in my grad school application . . . I mean, I don't even know if I want to go to grad school, but it's, like, so hard out here."  Shortly after, a refined young man said to the same choreographer: "My adviser told me to just sit down and make sentences. So I did that and, you know, walked away with a PhD." This account of academic achievement, despite its shoegaze simplicity, seemed like rather sound advice to a choreographer (or critic). Though May's piece seemed milquetoast and insular (full as it was of inside jokes about dance that made the dance-world folks in the audience chuckle to themselves), it became clear that a venture like American Realness is absolutely vital. The conversation and kvetching (and posturing and flattering) that was going on before the doors opened galvanized the spirit of realness, which at its best foregrounds both attitude and inclusion. In a political moment where feelings of anger, alienation, and profound uncertainty are reinforced daily, American Realness continues to be not only an outlet, but a lifeline.

Randy Dudley at Ameringer | McEnery | Yohe

Randy Dudley at Ameringer | McEnery | Yohe

ARTnews, Pictures at an Exhibition

8 February 2017

Today’s show: Randy Dudley’s solo exhibition is on view at Ameringer | McEnery | Yohe in New York through Saturday, February 11. The show presents recent drawings by the Illinois–based artist.

Emily Mason at Ameringer | McEnery | Yohe

Emily Mason at Ameringer | McEnery | Yohe

Artnet, David Ebony's Top 10 New York Gallery Shows This Winter

7 February 2017

by David Ebony

While a younger generation of artists, led by Katharina Grosse, Carol Bove, and others, are finding renewed significance and surprising rewards in extemporaneous abstract painting and sculpture, certain veterans like Emily Mason never lost faith in its limitless possibilities. Mason is heir to a long lineage of artistic forebears, perhaps most notably her mother, Alice Trumbull Mason, who was a founding member of the American Abstract Artists group in the mid-1930s. Emily’s childhood memories include visits from Mondrian, and watching Miró paint in a studio adjacent to her mother’s. Painting was in her blood, but she diverged from her mother’s penchant for hard-edge abstraction, and instead gravitated in the 1950s toward a more informal, intuitive process centered on color relationships and fluid gestures, which she has been developing and refining ever since. Her expansive and elusive compositions in some way establish a vital link between Abstract Expressionism and Color Field painting.

Emily Mason at Ameringer | McEnery | Yohe

Emily Mason at Ameringer | McEnery | Yohe

Hamptons Art Hub, ART REVIEW: Emily Mason Paintings Revel in the Ambiguity of Proximity

31 January 2017

by Peter Malone 

Emily Mason, a painter whose work represents both a unique marriage of understatement and gestural expression and a union of vibrant color and minimalist reserve, receives an examined look at her recent work at Ameringer | McEnery | Yohe Gallery.

Measured by Mason’s simultaneous participation in the “Inventing Downtown” show at NYU’s Grey Art Gallery—a show about artist-run galleries in the early 1950s—the artist’s career has been built on decades of developing a painterly language loose enough to allow multiple voicing, yet purposeful enough to assert a lone sensibility.

Bo Bartlett at the Mennello Museum of American Art, Orlando, FL

Bo Bartlett at the Mennello Museum of American Art, Orlando, FL

Orlando Sentinel, At OMA and the Mennello: Wyeths' of Maine and Bartlett's view of the world

26 January 2017

By Matthew J. Palm

Waves crash. The skeleton of a huge ship rises through scaffolding. Fishermen haul in their catch. Shoreline plants take on a delicate purple hue.

These are images of Maine, and the Pine Tree State is at center stage in the latest exhibition at Orlando Museum of Art.

The Wyeths and American Artists in Maine” will be on view through April 23. It’s a chance to see works by three generations of the famed Wyeth family of artists — N.C., Andrew and Jamie — as well as others. The exhibit is also a chance to reflect, or learn about, the significance of that northern neck of the woods to the visual arts.

Hans Hofmann at MOCA Jacksonville, Jacksonville, FL

Hans Hofmann at MOCA Jacksonville, Jacksonville, FL

The Florida-Times Union, New MOCA exhibit, 'Hans Hofmann: Works on Paper' documents long career of an artist who 'transcended genre and style'

26 January 2017

by Charlie Patton

Though he is considered one of the pioneers of abstract expressionism, during his long career the German-born painter-turned-U.S. citizen Hans Hofmann embraced many styles.

Born in 1880, he was first drawn to Impressionism. He then spent time in Paris in the early 1900s where he befriended Pablo Picasso, Georges Braque and Henri Matisse and embraced such movements as Cubism and Fauvism.

You can’t characterize him with one individual style,” said the Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville’s curator Jaime DeSimone. “He reinvented himself time and time again.”

Tracy Miller at Mrs. Gallery, Maspeth, NY

Tracy Miller at Mrs. Gallery, Maspeth, NY

Hyperallergic, Rehabilitating the Untrendy Tradition of Still Life Painting

18 January 2017

by Lilly Lampe

There is perhaps no genre in painting today more unassuming than the floral still life. Even at the height of Western genre painting, which reached its apogee in Northern Europe in the 16th and 17th centuries, the still life was considered to be the lowest within the hierarchy of painting, far behind history painting, landscape, and portraiture. Though the modernists played with vases and flowers, distorting them into Cubist near-abstractions, or incorporating collage in ways that were revolutionary at the time, still life innovation may have peaked in that era. But perhaps, in the current arena of painting, the very act of still life painting can be transgressive, a flagrant rejection of other popular tropes. As such, the gusto of More at Mrs. Gallery in Maspeth, Queens — a two-person show featuring paintings by Sarah Bedford and Tracy Miller — is at once daring and sweet, both a refreshing revitalization of the still life as subject matter, and a cheery antidote to the doldrums of so many other painting trends.

Wolf Kahn receives 2017 Medal of Arts

Wolf Kahn receives 2017 Medal of Arts

VTDigger, Vermont Artist Wolf Kahn wins U.S. State Department Honor

17 January 2017

BRATTLEBORO — Vermont artist Wolf Kahn has reaped many awards in a life as colorful as his work, but the 89-year-old just traveled to Washington, D.C., to receive his first medal. “It’s big and heavy, with a blue ribbon you can put around your neck,” he says. “I thought I was getting the Medal of Freedom the president gave to the vice president.”

Although Kahn didn’t win the same accolade President Barack Obama surprised Joe Biden with on Thursday, the master of vibrant oil paint and pastels received a hefty honor the same day: the U.S. State Department’s International Medal of Arts.

Emily Mason at Ameringer | McEnery | Yohe

Emily Mason at Ameringer | McEnery | Yohe

BLOUIN ARTINFO

17 January 2017

Ameringer | McEnery | Yohe in New York is hosting an exhibition of the works of artist Emily Mason, on view through 11 February 2017.

The exhibition presents a series of recent paintings by American painter Emily Mason (b. 1932). Known for works that celebrate the expressive possibilities of color, each painting by Emily Mason are impregnated with individual mood and captures specific emotional and chromatic temperature, invigorated with her nuanced touch. Sheets of vibrant hues with varying density fill across her canvases, as flat expanses merge with delicate clusters of pigment, creating deceptively complex compositions. Over six decades, the artist has explored through her distinctive style of lyrical, luminous abstraction, which reflects through her paintings executed in oil, carrying a sense of intriguing intimacy combined with uncompromising yet gentle intensity.

Franklin Evans at The Fountainhead, Miami, FL

Franklin Evans at The Fountainhead, Miami, FL

Artist Residency

1 - 28 February 2017

The Fountainhead Residency provides artists an environment to create, converse, inspire and be inspired outside of daily routines and traditional confines of their home life.  From the moment artists arrive they’re immersed in the visual beauty of Miami and the color and depth of the local community.  In addition to creating work while at The Residency; artists attend openings and talks, visit museums and galleries, and receive vital feedback from art professionals through one-on-one studio visits and public open houses.

Emily Mason at Grey Art Gallery, NYU

Emily Mason at Grey Art Gallery, NYU

The New York Times, When Artists Ran the Show: ‘Inventing Downtown,’ at N.Y.U.

12 January 2017

When a call went out online recently for an art world protest strike — “no work, no school, no business” — on Inauguration Day, more than 200 artists, most based in New York, many well known, quickly signed on. In numbers, they represent a mere fraction of the present art world, and there was reason to expect the list would grow. By contrast, in New York in the 1950s, 200 artists pretty much were that world, and one divided into several barely tangent circles.

That era’s cultural geometry has been badly in need of study, and now it’s getting some in a labor-of-love exhibition called “Inventing Downtown: Artist-Run Galleries in New York City, 1952-1965,” at the Grey Art Gallery at New York University. With nearly 230 objects, it’s big and has its share of stars. But it’s not a masterpiece display. It’s something almost better: a view of typical — rather than outstanding — art, of familiar artists looking unfamiliar, and of strangers you’re glad to meet. It looks the way history looks before the various MoMAs get their sanitizing hands on it: funky, diverse, down to earth, with things to teach us now.

David Allan Peters at Royale Projects, Los Angeles, CA

David Allan Peters at Royale Projects, Los Angeles, CA

22 January - 31 March 2017

Royale Projects is proud to present a solo exhibition of new works by Los Angeles artist David Allan Peters from 22 January to 31 March 2017. There will be an open house from 12 to 5 pm on Sunday, 22 January 2017. 

Julio Larraz at Museum of Art - DeLand, DeLand, FL

Julio Larraz at Museum of Art - DeLand, DeLand, FL

Julio Larraz: Painting and Sculpture

20 January - 2 April 2017

Julio Larraz, extraordinary draftsman, painter and sculptor, is the quintessential embodiment of the post-World War II Latin American artist.  Unmasking the angst of humanity, he sets out a new reality and politically conscious self-identity for existence in the modern world. His contribution to Western art, like that of the “boom” generation of Latin American writers, is a new kind of portraiture, which co-opts the conventions of the genre and transforms them into multilevel sociological and historical allegories.

Opening Night Reception: Friday 20 January, 5pm to 7pm

Lecture: "Julio Larraz: Painting in Time and Space" Carol Damian, Ph.D. Friday 10 February, 5pm to 6:30pm

Museum of Art - DeLand 600 N. Woodland Boulevard DeLand, FL 32720

Wolf Kahn to receive Department of State's 2017 International Medal of Arts

Wolf Kahn to receive Department of State's 2017 International Medal of Arts

17 December 2016

The Medal of Arts award was initiated by Art in Embassies in 2013 to formally acknowledge artists who have played an exemplary role in advancing the U.S. Department of State's mission of promoting cultural diplomacy.

Bo Bartlett at The Mennello Museum of American Art, Orlando, FL

Bo Bartlett at The Mennello Museum of American Art, Orlando, FL

Bo Bartlett: American Artist

27 January - 7 May 2017

The exhibition presents large-scale oil paintings that are figurative, psychologically imbued, beautifully rendered, and wonderfully sublime by one of the most significant Realist painters of his generation.  Bo Bartlett is an American realist with a modernist vision whose multi-layered narrative work falls within the tradition of American realism as defined by artists such as Thomas Eakins and Winslow Homer to Edward Hopper and Andrew Wyeth. Like these artists, Bartlett looks at America's land and people to describe the beauty he finds in everyday life. His paintings celebrate the underlying epic nature of the commonplace and the personal significance of the extraordinary.  Of Bartlett’s work, Wyeth wrote, “Bo Bartlett is very American.  He is fresh, he’s gifted, and he’s what we need in this country.  Bo is one of the very few I feel this strongly about.”

Emily Mason at Grey Art Gallery, NYU

Emily Mason at Grey Art Gallery, NYU

Inventing Downtown: Artist-Run Galleries in New York City, 1952–1965

10 January - 1 April 2017

Examining the New York art scene during the fertile years between the apex of Abstract Expressionism and the rise of Pop Art and Minimalism, Inventing Downtown: Artist-Run Galleries in New York City, 1952–1965 is the first show ever to survey this vital period from the vantage point of its artist-run galleries—crucibles of experimentation and innovation that radically changed the art world. With more than 200 paintings, sculptures, installations, drawings, photographs, ephemera, and films, the show reveals a scene that was much more diverse than has previously been acknowledged, with women and artists of color playing major roles. It features works by abstract and figurative painters and sculptors, as well as pioneers of installation and performance art. Artists range from well-known figures such as Jim Dine, Red Grooms, Allan Kaprow, Alex Katz, Yayoi Kusama, Claes Oldenburg, Yoko Ono, and Mark di Suvero, to those who deserve to be better known, including Emilio Cruz, Lois Dodd, Rosalyn Drexler, Sally Hazelet Drummond, Jean Follett, Lester Johnson, Boris Lurie, Jan Müller, and Aldo Tambellini.

Inventing Downtown is curated by Melissa Rachleff, clinical associate professor in NYU’s Steinhardt School.

Franklin Evans at Abrons Arts Center

Franklin Evans at Abrons Arts Center

XLtime

5 - 22 January 2017

Abrons Arts Center, Main Gallery 466 Grand Street / FREE

Franklin Evans creates painting installations with the artist’s studio as his subject. Evans collaborated with Trajal Harrell on the scenic design for Twenty Looks or Paris is Burning at the Judson church (S). American Realness 2017 presents the release of the digital publication of Trajal Harrell’s Twenty Looks or Paris is Burning at The Judson Church (XL). The release is accompanied by an installation, entitled XLtime, created by visual artist Franklin Evans made in collaboration with (XL).

Gene Davis at Smithsonian American Art Museum

Gene Davis at Smithsonian American Art Museum

Gene Davis: Hot Beat

18 November 2016 - 2 April 2017

Brightly colored stripes multiply in rhythmic repetitions across the surface of a painting by Gene Davis. Remarkably original when they first appeared in the 1960s, these paintings became the signature expression for one of the leading Color Field painters. With no more than a rectangular canvas and multicolor stripes, Davis created a richly varied body of work that looks as fresh today as it did when it first was shown. The large size of most of his canvases from the 1960s requires a viewer to consider the relationships and rhythms over time, more like a musical composition than the dynamic, colorful, pop art images that emerged at the same time.

Rod Penner at Osthaus Museum Hagen

Rod Penner at Osthaus Museum Hagen

PHOTOREALISM: 50 Years of Hyperrealistic Painting

16 October 2016 - 8 January 2017

We are pleased to announce that two paintings by Rod Penner are featured in the exhibition FOTOREALISMUS: 50 Jahre hyperrealistische Malerei (PHOTOREALISM: 50 Years of Hyperrealistic Painting), at Osthaus Museum Hagen in Hagen, Germany.

Hans Hofmann at Kunsthalle Bielefeld

Hans Hofmann at Kunsthalle Bielefeld

Creation in Form and Color: Hans Hofmann

5 November 2016 - 5 March 2017

The exhibition Creation in Form and Color: Hans Hofmann is a collaborative project by the Berkeley Art Museum, the Pacific Film Archive at the University of California (BAMPFA), and the Kunsthalle Bielefeld. It is based on a precise selection of approximately 60 paintings, watercolors, and drawings that span the artist’s entire career from the 1920s to the early 1960s. The show includes works on loan from the Berkeley Art Museum, as well as from prominent American and European museums and private collections. One of the exhibit’s particular goals is to examine Hans Hofmann before the backdrop of his European tradition in his role as an important artist and teacher of 20th century American modernism. Additionally, the show weighs his exploration of his experiences and influences in his chosen homeland of America, while simultaneously emphasizing his theories and work, which made him an especially significant artistic mediator between the continents. Despite his fundamental importance to the development of modern art in America—where prominent exhibitions were devoted to him during his lifetime—Hofmann remains less well known in Germany and Europe as a member of the Modernist avant-garde.

Liat Yossifor at PATRON, Chicago, IL

Liat Yossifor at PATRON, Chicago, IL

A Body of Water

5 November 2016 - 14 January 2017

Opening Reception: Saturday 5 November, 4-7pm

PATRON is proud to present our first solo exhibition by Los Angeles based artist Liat Yossifor, titled A Body of Water. The exhibition will be on view from 5 November through January with an opening reception on Saturday, 5 November, from 4 to 7PM.

Markus Linnenbrink at 75 Rockefeller Plaza

Markus Linnenbrink at 75 Rockefeller Plaza

Early 2017

Markus Linnenbrink to install a 7 x 90 foot epoxy resin painting in the Concourse Lobby of 75 Rockefeller Plaza in New York, New York in early 2017.

John Sonsini at the Whitney Museum of American Art

John Sonsini at the Whitney Museum of American Art

Human Interest: Portraits from the Whitney's Collection

27 April 2016 - 12 February 2017

We are pleased to announce that a work by John Sonsini—Byron & Ramiro, 2008, Acrylic on canvas—is presently installed in Human Interest: Portraits from the Whitney's Collection, on view at the Whitney Museum of American Art through 12 February 2017.

Bo Bartlett at Delaware Art Museum

Bo Bartlett at Delaware Art Museum

Delaware Art Museum Presents Truth & Vision: 21st Century Realism

22 October 2016 - 22 January 2017

The Delaware Art Museum is pleased to present Truth & Vision: 21st Century Realism. On view October 22, 2016 – January 22, 2017, this exhibition surveys the state of representational painting at the beginning of the 21st century and features approximately 40 works by 20 contemporary realist artists from throughout the United States and Canada.

Sandra Mendelsohn Rubin at Delaware Art Museum

Sandra Mendelsohn Rubin at Delaware Art Museum

Truth & Vision: 21st Century Realism

22 October 2016 - 22 January 2017

Inspired by Robert C. Jackson’s 2014 publication, Behind the Easel: The Unique Voices of 20 Contemporary Representational Painters, this exhibition surveys the state of realistic painting at the start of the 21st century. Indicative of this moment are two trends in representational painting–the depiction of the natural world and the creation of fantastic imaginings. Featuring artists from throughout the United States and Canada, including Steven Assael, Bo Bartlett, Debra Bermingham, Margaret Bowland, Paul Fenniak, Scott Fraser, Woody Gwyn, F. Scott Hess, Laurie Hogin, Robert C. Jackson, Alan Magee, Janet Monafo, John Moore, Charles Pfahl, Scott Prior, Stone Roberts, Sandra Mendelsohn Rubin, Daniel Sprick, Will Wilson, and Jerome Witkin, Truth & Vision: 21st Century Realism reveals the contemporary developments in a mode of painting historically tied to the greater Brandywine Valley.

Brian Alfred at Denver Art Museum

Brian Alfred at Denver Art Museum

Audacious: Contemporary Artists Speak Out

21 February 2016 - February 2017

Brian Alfred's City Sunrise, 2004, will be on exhibition in the Denver Art Museum's reinstallation of the Modern & Contemporary galleries. Audacious: Contemporary Artists Speak Out officially opens to the public February 21, 2016 and will be on view through February 2017.